The Proof Parade 1937 Frigidaire Division, General Motors




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Promoting the new Frigidaire “Super-Duty” refrigerators for 1937. Produced by Jam Handy.

Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frigidaire
Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Frigidaire is the US consumer and commercial home appliances brand subsidiary of European parent company Electrolux. Frigidaire was founded as the Guardian Frigerator Company in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and developed the first self-contained refrigerator (invented by Nathaniel B. Wales and Alfred Mellowes) in 1916. In 1918, William C. Durant, a founder of General Motors, personally invested in the company and in 1919, it adopted the name Frigidaire. “American Restoration” (History Channel) featured a c. 1919/1920’s “General Motors” refrigerator “by Frigidaire” with refrigeration coils on top of the unit originally advertised as iconic “golden angel halos”. The brand was so well known in the refrigeration field in the early-to-mid-1900s that many Americans called any refrigerator a Frigidaire regardless of brand. In France, Quebec and some other French-speaking countries or areas, the word Frigidaire is often in use as a synonym today. The name Frigidaire or its antecedent Frigerator may be the origin of the widely used English word fridge, although more likely simply an abbreviation of refrigerator which is a word known to have been used as early as 1611.

From 1919 to 1979, the company was owned by General Motors. During that period, it was first a subsidiary of Delco-Light and was later an independent division based in Dayton, Ohio. The division also manufactured the compressors for GM’s cars that were equipped with air conditioning. Frigidaire was sold to the White Sewing Machine Company in 1979, which in 1986 was purchased by Electrolux, its current parent.

While the company was owned by General Motors, its logo featured the phrase “Product of General Motors”, and later renamed to “Home Environment Division of General Motors”.

The company claims firsts including:

Electric self-contained refrigerator (September, 1918 in Detroit)

Home food freezer

Room air conditioner

30″ electric range

Coordinated colors for home appliances…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durable_good

In economics, a durable good or a hard good or consumer durable is a good that does not quickly wear out, or more specifically, one that yields utility over time rather than being completely consumed in one use. Items like bricks could be considered perfectly durable goods because they should theoretically never wear out. Highly durable goods such as refrigerators or cars usually continue to be useful for three or more years of use, so durable goods are typically characterized by long periods between successive purchases.

Examples of consumer durable goods include automobiles, books, household goods (home appliances, consumer electronics, furniture, tools, etc.), sports equipment, jewelry, medical equipment, firearms, and toys.

Nondurable goods or soft goods (consumables) are the opposite of durable goods. They may be defined either as goods that are immediately consumed in one use or ones that have a lifespan of less than three years.

Examples of nondurable goods include fast-moving consumer goods such as cosmetics and cleaning products, food, condiments, fuel, beer, cigarettes and tobacco, medication, office supplies, packaging and containers, paper and paper products, personal products, rubber, plastics, textiles, clothing, and footwear.

While durable goods can usually be rented as well as bought, nondurable goods generally are not rented. While buying durable goods comes under the category of investment demand of goods, buying non-durables comes under the category of consumption demand of goods…

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